1x09 - “The Eye”

oni-queen:

I’ve had these official sketches of Cybersix characters saved on my hard drive for over ten years. You’re welcome.

4chansey:

4CHANSEY'S ART SUPPLIES GIVEAWAY

I recently saved up and bought myself a new tablet so I’ve decided to give one of my old ones away along with some of the PROMARKER markers I’ve accumulated! 
The winner will receive everything in the photos and I will ship internationally. 

I’m looking forward to seeing who the winner of this giveaway is so I can witness them using these supplies and do them justice!

RULES:
✿ Mbf me 

✿ No giveaway blogs! 

✿ Must be comfortable giving me your address!
✿ Reblog as many times as you want! Likes do not count but are allowed! 

✿ The giveaway will end on the 1/Nov/14 & the winner will be picked with a random generator!

GOOD LUCK
howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




arythusa:

I am looking to hire a colorist for my new webcomic The Glass Scientists!

Coming from an animation background, my art style favors simple, clean cell-shading, limited color palates, and economy of visual storytelling- elaborate, finely rendered oil paintings will not mesh well with my lineart! The value/color work for the comic needs to emphasize character acting and help each image read quickly and clearly (good use of contrast to make the important elements of a shot “pop”).

I will, however, need a colorist with a good sense of lighting for tone and setting! I will be providing lighting thumbnails (and occasionally color keys) for each shot set up, but I need someone will be able to carry that intention through to finished pieces!

You will be paid on a per-page basis at one page per week, though I may bump that up to 2 pages per week for the beginning of chapter 1 or for special events.I’m looking to start in the beginning of October.

Here are some examples of styles similar to what I am looking for: 'Kill Switch Engage', Blindsprings, and Gravity Falls. Also, please see these sample pages from my short comic Bleeding Heart for an idea of the kind of linework I do:

(Note: Since I work on the show, it’s kind of inevitable that I would look to the gorgeous color work on Gravity Falls- I don’t expect something that crazy detailed, of course, but it is worth noting that the crazy amount of variety found in GF backgrounds are accomplished with three fairly simple layers: a cell-shaded flats layer, a shadow layer set to multiply, and a simple light glow layer.)

If you are interested, or if you know someone you would recommend, send me an Ask or email me at glitterygothic (at) gmail.com ! Please include samples of your work. For my first chapter, I am especially looking for examples of night-time scenes and use of limited color palate!

fayren:

I get a lot of questions about my process so I thought it’d be cool to break down and talk about some of my steps for illustrating covers! I hope this is helpful or interesting, it’s not quite a tutorial but perhaps it’s a glimpse into my thought process.

Step 1 | Thumbnail. The point here is to do several very fast, small, drawings, so you can’t get hung up on details. Here I’m thinking most about composition and subject. I had four originally and this one was picked to get finished.

Step 2 | Sketch. I draw on top of my thumbnail, nailing down more of the actual details. I fix any proportion isssues but I still try not to waste too much time making final lines, the sketch will go away in the end, so it just needs to be good enough for me. 

Step 3 | Background Painting. A lot of lightning and mood is set by the environment, so I start with determining their background. I browse through lots of inspirational paintings and photographs during this stage, and try to get a palette in my head for the overall piece. I use the lasso tool to fill in their silhouettes with black and lock the layer transparency. The silhouette is very important for readability, so I make sure even without colors the shapes are distinct.

Step 4 | Rough Color Blocking. I block in base colors and basic lighting under the sketch layer, blocking in the different materials and colors. 

Step 5 | The Fun Part. Here’s where I just get to zone out and paint. I flatten the sketch onto the color blocked layer (if you’re nervous, you can always duplicate these layers and tuck them into another folder before you flatten and commit) and finally get to painting. The sketch eventually gets entirely painted over. Things I’m thinking about during this stage: different materials, changes in planes, drawing from the background colors. 

Stage 6 | Details. I use the lasso tool and fill to do very tiny details like scratches, small specular highlights, etc. I add some wear and tear and knock out a bit of Fulcrum’s teeth. (huhuhu)

Stage 7 | MOAR BLOOD. At this point I decided there wasn’t enough energon dripping off of Tarn and I added more on a new layer. Again, grabbing areas with the lasso tool, filling, and erasing parts of it to make it appear transparent. 

Stage 8 | Lighting Effects. I add some soft glows to Tarn’s lights, but keep his forehead light the brightest. I want it to be the main source of light in the scene so I don’t want to distract. Light is bouncing through the pink energon, so I made the light falling on Tarn’s face more pink. 

Stage 9 | Final Lights. I add a harsh white rim light to both of the figures, really pulling them away from the background to finalize the painting.